280 Comments

No matter what proof you have, some made up their minds long before the event.

This is on both sides of the argument.

On the other hand, you demonstrate that you looked deep into the aspects and came up with the most probable cause of his death.

👍

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What does the clinical scenario look like if GF swallowed a massive chunk of fentanyl as the officers were arresting him? There are photos of GF with a large chunk of a white substance in his mouth as officers initially approached him. Progressively worsening dyspnea and then loss of consciousness ? Of course he’s lucid and talking at first, and then the drugs were absorbed into his system. 11ng/dL is fatal.

A 160lb man is not going to suffocate a 260lb man with light pressure on his back. Come on Pierre.

I am a practicing anesthesiologist and expert in the use of Fentanyl.

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Everyone has a right to survive an arrest. When you resist you forfeit that right. The murder conviction was societal revenge. Floyd died because his culture taught him to resist. The officer was guilty at most of involuntary manslaughter. Your report and data is correct, but it really doesn't point to why he died. He died because his society told him to resist to death. He isn't alone. He could have been free of intoxicants; no matter.

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Doctor Kory, in spite of some people’s inability to perceive, or determination not to, I honor you for not allowing that to cause you to give up your valiant attempts to present logical proof. I will try to do the same and “keep on keeping on.” 👊🙌❤️

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I'm a huge fan of yours and been following you and the FLCCC for over two years. That being said, I am not qualified to judge the detailed medical arguments in this case. I think most people have a problem with the way this issue was politicized and the police officers involved vilified. We had just come off of the whole Jessie Smollett hoax. There is no denying that Floyd resisted arrest and became violent and potentially dangerous to the officers or the fact that he had very high levels of drugs in his system. I don't think you can argue that his behavior, health, and drug use did not contribute to his death. Was the amount of force used necessary, I don't know, but I do know that it was not the only cause of his death. He was using a technique that is authorized by the police force. I don't believe that officers can be expected to anticipate all the possible medical outcomes from using approved suspect detention techniques. For those not used to dealing with dangerous and dishonest suspects it is easy to judge their actions. Coming from a family of police officers I am painfully aware of the people and situations they deal with. Unfortunately, one police officer in the family has quit and will never do police work again due to the events of the last few years. He felt his life was being endangered by the restrictions that have been put on the officers and the lack of support. It is sad for society because he is just the type of officers that we need. We wouldn't be having this conversation if people had confidence in the judicial system and this trial was judged to be fair!

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Oct 24, 2023·edited Oct 24, 2023

I’m perfectly willing to accept that Dr. Kory’s conclusion that George Floyd was inadvertently suffocated by the police officers restraining him. And I thank him for taking the time to explain things.

To my mind, the facts that George Floyd had already complained about “not being able to breath” while sitting in the police car, and the fact that criminals are notorious for feigning ailments to derail cops’ procedures led them to put two and two together and in this case get 5, to not understand that that time his complaints were very real and very serious.

Perhaps they were negligent, ultimately guilty of negligent homicide, but none of the evidence I saw has persuaded me that the police were deliberately reckless with George Floyd’s life. Had George Floyd not already complained “of being unable to breath” while sitting upright and unrestrained, and had they not just arrested him for fraud (counterfeiting) I think their culpability would have been much greater.

I don’t believe the jurors felt they could dispassionately and fairly pursue justice when they knew very well that their names and home addresses would be blasted across the country and cause life changing consequences for them if they reached the “wrong” conclusion. It was a travesty of a trial.

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Thanks for your further well reasoned and supported arguments. Though to echo what others have already written, and as the past three to four years have repeatedly illustrated, no amount of reason or critical thought will persuade people too married to a narrative whether that's with masks, mRNA injections, ivermectin, George Floyd or whatever. Some people will not accept any data or evidence that contradicts what they want to believe or need to believe to maintain his or her identity or position in a tribe.

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Oct 24, 2023·edited Oct 24, 2023

I've lost a bit of respect for you Dr Kory. Your assumptions of Floyd being tolerant to drugs and he could NOT have passed from a drug overdose is a bit unsettling. You never saw the body and you only evaluated information that was written down by others.... who obviously had a stake in denying any other cause for the death than police brutality. Strange you have NO suspicion of a corrupt system that would NOT tell the truth of the death for fear of causing riots. Several items were omitted from the reports such as Floyd swallowing what drugs he had on his person as he was being arrested. THAT was a substantial amount for anyone to have consumed and more so for a man who was already higher than a kite. I HAVE FOLLOWED YOU ALL THE WAY FROM MILWAUKEE TO CALIFORNIA AND ALL THE WAY THROUGH YOUR IVERMECTIN PATH FOR WHICH I GAVE YOU MUCH RESPECT AND HONOR FOR STANDING UP FOR IVERMECTIN but this about Floyd is not what I ever would have expected from you.... to evaluate other people's words and then give them 100% blind credibility without even a doubt of the truth being withheld. Seems the system has finally corrupted you too... sad.... seems there is no one strong enough to stand up for the truth except Trump and he is paying one hell of a price for doing so. Not much of what you say is going to be considered anymore.... the system bought you and now we lose.

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Hope to meet you in person someday. I’ll be sure to bring husband. He has 21 years of law enforcement experience. Norfolk and Louisville, currently homicide detective (cold case). As for the medical opinion, it makes sense to me but is irrelevant to the broader concerns of what happened following that particular incident. Planned, paid riots. Destruction of small businesses and more death, including the death of a local black businessman here in Louisville. Very un-American. That is not the kind of justice any of us should demand.

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The audio of the coroner who performed the autopsy on Floyd was carried during several radio newscasts, and he made it very clear that Floyd had a fentanyl level in his blood three times the lethal dose for someone who wasn't addicted to it.

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Pierre: Gathering from some of the comments above, a lot of people just don’t want to deal with facts. Or maybe, subconsciously, it is really hard from them to believe that there are some officers (just like some priests, some Boy Scout Leaders, some physicians (Larry Nassar), etc.) who are either anti-social or have some other serious psychiatric disorder. The same thing is operative today with people trying to make excuses for Hamas. I am an Addiction Physician and well aware of the effects of Fentanyl and the other drugs patients are concurrently taking. I have admitted many people in withdrawal. I also happen to have several friends who are police officers. Not one of them defended this officer. In fact, one of them who was both an Emergency Physician and SWAT team officer sent me an article he had published in Police magazine, a periodical for officers, entitled “How to Prevent Positional Asphyxia” (Sept. 9, 2019). So this is both a physician and a police officer who felt a need to educate other officers about the proper technique. That tells me there was a known problem. Derek Chauvin had his knee on Floyd’s neck for 9 minutes and 29 seconds. If you watch the videos carefully, you will see he never changes the expression on his face, appears to be disconnected from what’s going on around him, and had to be prodded by paramedics to let them near Floyd. Testimony showed he had multiple similar previous complaints from citizens. Did Floyd have several drugs in his system? Yes, but he was up, walking and talking, prior to almost 10 minutes of pressure on his trachea. Prior to that, he had walked into a business and tried to give a fake $20 bill to a business owner. So a lot of time had passed while he was under the influence. He was not experiencing any symptoms of impending respiratory arrest. Does anyone here remember that the first officer on the scene actually got out of his car with is weapon drawn? (Over a $20 bill,not an armed robbery) Did Derek Chauvin “intend” to kill him? I doubt it, but there is some reason he would not relent with the pressure from his knee. Most officers would have handcuffed him, put him in the back of the squad, and been done with him. But despite a man telling him he could not breathe, a crowd screaming at him, and paramedics trying to get to the man, Derek would not let up. I respect your conclusion as a Pulmonologist and Critical Care doctor and think at this point, you should just forget about trying to explain things to people who have made up their minds, did not see all the evidence you saw, and refuse to acknowledge their are sometimes people in positions of power who have serious psychiatric problems.

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They should have called EMS for sure. I’m guessing the officers knew him well, and it’s possible they thought he was acting. It happens a lot in the field when people don’t want to go to jail. What a shit job. I can’t believe people still sign up for it.

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As a 38 year police veteran, it’s known as “Positional Asphyxia” as what I have taught and was taught.

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In your opening rebuttal below,

"In my previous post on the George Floyd case, I presented a truncated version of the reasoning and evidence supporting my legal expert opinion report and the official eleven-page legal, written testimony that I submitted to the lawyers who retained me in his civil case."

You can stop right there Dr. Kory; you mentioned LEGAL more than you needed too; anytime LEGAL, LAWYER is in the conversation, you can throw it out the window; it is all horse shit!! That is precisely the problem with the current state of affairs in the United States: Lawyers are running the show. Where are the lawyers for the vaccine injured? Where are lawyers for people beaten to oblivion because they didn't wear face diapers? Derek Chauvin Saved the state of Minnesota a lot of money, especially for a coward like George Floyd, who was on a continuous crime spree. Floyd was a cancer to society, and you being a doctor, Dr. Kory, you don't remove some of the cancer. You remove all of it.

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The case was never about who or what killed that scumbag. It was about politics 100%.

Was the restraining method legal? Was it part of standard police training?

Yes.

Was Floyd resisting and fighting cops?

Yes.

Does the opioid dose in his blood raise a reasonable doubt about why he died? I'm not talking dispositive, scientific, from-on-high proof, which is not required by our legal system, but does it raise the old "reasonable doubt"?

Yes.

Case ***effin*** closed.

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I recall seeing previous video or testimony that George Floyd would say "I can't breath' when put into custody. I also watched Candace Owen's movie The Biggest Lie Ever Told that showed half chewed pills in the floor of the car as well as him telling the cop he took pills. I'm not a doctor and won't claim to be one, but I'm a middle aged women who recognizes patterned behavior and what people do when they're in trouble. You seem to think the statement "I can't breathe" means more than it does. He was a liar and a person who often got in trouble and he took a bunch of pills. It's hard to determine anything except his tragic loss being his own fault caused by his bad judgement and behavior.

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