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I saw with my own eyes that the Minneapolis PD police officers’ manual recommended such chokeholds to subdue violent people resisting arrest. A murder conviction not only requires a dead person but also the intent to kill someone. Legally speaking, you can commit a homicide by accident but not murder. Nobody ever showed a shred of evidence that officer Chauvin intended to kill George Floyd in front of cell phone cameras. That would be incredibly stupid. To suggest that he was guilty of murder is in my opinion defamatory. Inadvertent homicide? Perhaps. Intentional murder? Ridiculous, in my opinion. Officer chauvin in my opinion is a political prisoner, the victim of a jury afraid that the media would release their home addresses if they didn’t cooperate with the regime change operation that was the George Floyd circus.

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Thank you Dr. Kory for this explanation!!! Like you I want the TRUTH to be told in any and all situations whether it be the Covid planned Demic, use of HCQ and Ivermectin as effective medicines in treating disease and autopsies in criminal cases!!! Integrity is fleeting in our society today and we must always be of the highest honor in all we present!!!

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Thanks for your integrity and commitment to truth

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George Floyd was yelling "I can't breathe" while sitting in the back of the squad-car. They only pulled him out of the car because he was throwing a fit that he "couldn't breathe". High dose Fentanyl causes severe respiratory depression that can lead to heart-attack. Fentanyl overdose causes Cessation of autonomic breathing process which causes asphyxiation that can cause heart-attack. Nobody had a knee on Floyd's chest as he yelled "I can't breathe" while sitting upright in the back of the squad-car, quite obviously highly "jacked up" on his favorite opiate.

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You should watch Candace’s documentary. He wasn’t on his neck. It wasn’t murder. Bad police work yes. Murder no. Also, Breonna Taylor narrative was also a lie & led to destruction of our city. We knew the real story, because husband is LMPD homicide detective. The entire BLM narrative was a purposeful lie to cause chaos and divide the country. Nothing new to we law enforcement families. We already had lived through “hands up don’t shoot”... another lie. I believe you probably think your analysis is correct. Maybe it is. But I hope you and other colleagues won’t fall for divisive headlines immediately after these cases happen. An officer we know shot and killed an unarmed man and you never heard about it. In March 2020, my husband worked numerous murders and shootings involving teenagers in Louisville, most of them black. None of them made national news. So, respectfully you missed the point.

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Thank you Dr Kory. That makes complete sense. I'm hoping Tucker Carlson has the integrity to change is position if he's presented & persuaded with your explanation/view point.

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Dr. Kory excellent analysis. You should have called me and I would have told you that in about 5 minutes.

As a spine surgeon I know that Floyd did not die of the knee on the neck and thus Chauvin is actually innocent. This is unpopular. As a matter of fact he is excluded. The real reason that Floyd died was because he could not expand his diaphragm. Yes he was suffocated.

Tucker and 90% of the physicians do not know that even though Floyd was speaking. That meant he could move air in and out of the trachea. Soft tissue swelling would have to be prolonged in the cervical spine and enough to cause closure. That typically happens when there is an anaphylactic reaction or a drug reaction from a medication like the BMP infuse. Notorious for causing death by soft tissue swelling.

The reason why I was clued in actually had nothing to do with my medical training. It was due to my sports background. In wrestling we use a maneuver called a "tight waist" where you wrap your arm around the opponent's waist and pull tight. This decreases the ability for the opponent to expand his diaphragm. A much more dramatic example is that of a person who gets caught in a scissors maneuver where the legs are scissored closed around the stomach or just below the chest under the xyphoid process. This renders the opponent completely helpless in seconds because it is not dead weight but an active compression forcing the diaphragm up allowing no respiration and causing extreme pain.

I am surprised that more people did not figure it out actually. There is a tragic story of a medical student who got stuck in a cave in Utah and he died the exact same way and they left his body there. I often think of him. As his chest was compressed and he expired as a result of prolonged inability to respirate.

By the way this works on animals as well. I have cats and I love my cats. All are strays and indoor outdoor and just grew up to be huge some are about 20 lbs. but at times cats act like cats and scratch and bite etc. which I am good with. When that get's out of hand I grab a handful of their tummy's skin and hair underneath and and tightly squeezing it you can hear the air exhale and the fracas is over. No pain just completely incapacitated by a lack of oxygen and then let go.

Same with large dogs. The tight waist is such a useful management tool because it causes no permanent injury once you let off of it and it requires only a few seconds to get the point across.

I often wonder if I could accomplish it with a big cat, a tad bit more dangerous because they weigh 600 pounds and can kill you with one bite to your neck. However it is still a matter of position and leverage and strength of course.

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Oct 22, 2023·edited Oct 22, 2023

Unless Tucker changes his prior ways, I doubt he'll retract or respond in any way. I contacted his producer after he said the Texas Army National Guard had not been deployed to the border when they had been there for months. My son is in the Texas Army National Guard and has been there a year and a half. I applaud that he produces information that others don't, but he seems to choose the pragmatic, teleological route at times in order to prove a point unfortunately.

I'm now certain that doing the right thing directly into the blast of the winter storm of evil is our only chance.

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With all due respect and as a BC Pulm/CCM myself who has seen many drug overdose patients, especially narcotics, I can attest from experience, that this presentation and scenario is certainly consistent with narcotic induced respiratory failure, hypoxia and death. I have personally seen many drug abusers who initially have almost superhuman strength and combativeness, perhaps related to being stimulated by catecholamine surge during a period where they are being restrained under very stressful conditions. If they have taken oral forms of narcotics, especially sustained release formulations, there will be a gradual increase in the absorption of the drug which could certainly reach a threshold which overcomes the catecholamine release. While again, I respect Dr. PK, all need to be aware that paid "expert witnesses" are not completely unbiased individuals and that his and my opinion are just that, opinions. The truth is therefore difficult to ascertain definitively. In the end, no one is deserving of an apology here, simply for coming up with a different conclusion after analyzing the evidence.

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This column only seems to address events once Floyd was on the ground. However, I watched the police bodycam showing Floyd in the police car. He was sitting upright and he was already saying "I can't breathe." He was saying this long before he was on the ground, knee or no. Why did he say this in the police car? I presume he was drowning in his own bodily fluid rushing into his lungs from an overdose. With 3 times the lethal level of fentanyl in his blood, that seems plausible. The article above appears to imply that his breathing was unobstructed until he was put on the ground, but that just isn't so.

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Oct 22, 2023·edited Oct 23, 2023

Until I read your post, I had accepted the fentanyl overdose explanation that had been offered in a number of places (the circumstances surrounding the crime, the protests, and the presence of Antifa and BLM primed me to think the worse of how the George Floyd death was handled). Your calm and systematic explanation of the evidence and analysis that led to your opinion was a welcome dose of rationality and integrity during a time when both seem to be in short supply.

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" I did not observe shallow or slowed breathing until he was put into prone restraint (i.e. face and chest down on a hard surface)"

So, why was he complaining about inability to breath in the police car several times, once when just sitting, other times when half sitting half laying, probably uncomfortable, not not quite like being held to the ground.

E.g. around 18:30, then 19:20... where he was not on his chest bur rather sitting angled 45° or so.

https://rumble.com/v1akq4q-full-george-floyd-body-camera-2-released.html

What was his problem there?

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Pierre, I appreciate your honesty and truthfulness and prioritizing facts.

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Oct 22, 2023·edited Oct 23, 2023

Two problems. First you were hired by the party that "wanted" to prove it was murder. Second, I find much of your rambling analysis "subjective" and therefore an opinion. Perhaps the officer contributed to Floyd's death with his actions. To what extent is unknowable. But, to ignore toxicology or even include it in your report, forces your predetermined conclusion. To the extreme, you moved the "I can't breathe" from the police car to the street - a lie. You gave the Jury what they wanted to hear and you were compensated for that. People lie for a price. You should be ashamed, not proud of your work.

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Thanks for your detailed explanation, Dr Kory. Hopefully Tucker will invite you on for a conversation involving much more than this subject.

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While I would never challenge your medical determinations, as I am not in that profession, I did watch the police bodycam video from the time George Floyd was located inside a small car with all the doors and windows shut (which contradicts his claim of claustrophobia). After being asked to get out of the car, he was handcuffed. The police then walked him down a sidewalk to the police car. All the while George Floyd was being escorted to the police car, he was claiming he could not breathe. There was no restraint on him other than hands cuffed behind his back and the walking pace was normal, not rushed. Murder One was a purely panicked conviction status, due to the threat of rioting outside the courthouse. I hope an appeal is successful. While George Floyd did not deserve to die, neither did Officer Chauvin deserve a Murder One life sentence.

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